➾ Escape from Slavery: The True Story of My Ten Years in Captivity and My Journey to Freedom in America Free ➵ Author Francis Bok – Vejega.info

➾ Escape from Slavery: The True Story of My Ten Years in Captivity and My Journey to Freedom in America Free ➵ Author Francis Bok – Vejega.info Winner Of The Books For A Better Life Suze Orman First Book AwardMay Seven Year Old Francis Bok Was Selling His Mother S Eggs And Peanuts Near His Village In Southern Sudan When Arab Raiders On Horseback Burst Into The Quiet Marketplace, Murdering Men And Gathering The Women And Young Children Into A Group Strapped To Horses And Donkeys, Francis And Others Were Taken North Into Lives Of Slavery Under Wealthy Muslim FarmersFor Ten Years, Francis Lived In A Shed Near The Goats And Cattle That Were His Responsibility After Two Failed Attempts To Flee Each Bringing Severe Beatings And Death Threats Francis Finally Escaped At Age Seventeen He Persevered Through Prison And Refugee Camps For Three Years, Winning The Attention Of United Nations Officials Who Granted Passage To AmericaNow A Student And An Antislavery Activist, Francis Bok Has Made It His Life Mission To Combat World Slavery His Is The First Voice To Speak To An Estimated Million People Held Against Their Will In Nearly Every Nation, Including Our Own Escape From Slavery Is At Once A Riveting Adventure, A Story Of Desperation And Triumph, And A Window Revealing A World That Few Have Survived To Tell During the invisible civil war in Sudan two million southern Sudanese have been killed and 4.4 million displaced Women and children not casualties of the war often ended up as slaves One of those slaves was a seven year old Dinka boy, Francis Piol Bol Buk Francis Bok.For the first seven years of Bok s life, Bok learned a strong work ethic that earned him the nickname twelve men , was a quick study, and received encouragement from father Bok was told repeatedly that he would one day do s During the invisible civil war in Sudan two million southern Sudanese have been killed and 4.4 million displaced Women and children not casualties of the war often ended up as slaves One of those slaves was a seven year old Dinka boy, Francis Piol Bol Buk Francis Bok.For the first seven years of Bok s life, Bok learned a strong work ethic that earned him the nickname twelve men , was a quick study, and received encouragement from father Bok was told repeatedly that he would one day do something great Bok was insulated from the centuries of tension between the North and the South Then, on his first unsupervised trip to the market Bok s world is turned upside down as Murahaliin descended on the market, killing the men, and sweeping up the women and children Children who resisted were dealt with swiftly When two sisters would not stop crying one was shot in the head and the other had her leg cut off Bok, however, was taken into slavery For the next ten years Bok used the lessons of his early childhood to learn Arabic, work hard enough to be indispensable, and plan his escape This is a fascinating first hand account of a subject of which most people have only vague knowledge including me While not a difficult read, Bok does an excellent job of unfolding his story through his eyes, giving a very brief history of the conflict, and sharing the hope that many around the world still find in America The subject matter is heavy but there are opportunities for an occasional smile A young Sudanese s experience with the snow of Fargo, North Dakota can t help but break the tension a bit I really appreciated Bok s reflection on the subject of slavery in American s history I was particularly struck by Bok s statement to President George W Bush at the signing of teh Sudan Peace Act, I also want to remind you that you are the first president in 150 years t meet wtih a former slave myself pg 269 Bok has been accused of being Anti Muslim While he unapologetically embrases his Christian faith and believes his safety is due to God s providence, he also relates the assistance offered by individual Muslims once he escaped Throughout the latter half of the 1900s, Sudan has been in a state of war There were times of peace in between but the war still continues today But that is true for many African countries So what makes this memoir any different The simple fact that Sudan still follows slavery customs that had been in vogue for centuries in the area The only country that still had legal slavery at the time Bok was enslaved was Mauritania.Born Francis Piol Bol Buk, this boy from the Dinka tribe had an ideali Throughout the latter half of the 1900s, Sudan has been in a state of war There were times of peace in between but the war still continues today But that is true for many African countries So what makes this memoir any different The simple fact that Sudan still follows slavery customs that had been in vogue for centuries in the area The only country that still had legal slavery at the time Bok was enslaved was Mauritania.Born Francis Piol Bol Buk, this boy from the Dinka tribe had an idealistic childhood that was rudely shattered one day without warning A raid in the marketplace that he was in resulted in many Dinka men dead and women and children enslaved He himself was taken home by an Arab man called Giemma Abdullah At the age of seven, Buk had become a slave The first half of the book is really heartwarming and sad as Bok narrates his life history under slavery His loneliness made me sad just imagining a poor young boy of seven all alone, bewildered, with nothing familiar to console him But Bok thrives and helps himself by adapting to the circumstances He learns Arabic and makes himself indispensable to his master, which probably saves his life All this is told in ruthless detail, and Bok is quite a good story teller, arousing all the right emotions.Eventually, he escapes and makes his way to Khartoum, Cairo, and finally to the US, where he begins to talk against slavery I do admire his guts and his bravery, but parts of this narrative seemed highly naive to me He goes on and on about how the great Americans were listening to a poor Dinka boy until I was vicariously embarrassed for him He seems to think the US can do absolutely no wrong, and should poke their noses everywhere merely because they accepted him as a refugee That s not how it works, though The same countries taking in refugees are also often the same ones that are creating them elsewhere.The Afterword was also quite naive Bok could probably do much better trying to raise awareness in his native country about these issues His assumption that only white people are called to account for genocide is really annoying as well The West is forever telling everyone else what to do, maybe that part has skipped Bok s attention He talks about India having thousands of slaves Did I miss something Unless he is talking about social inequalities, but that exists in his precious America too So, yeah context and clarification required here But mostly, I just cringed every single time he went oh, look at all these white people paying attention to black me I was quite annoyed too at the way he talked about men purchasing wives with cattle Apparently, the cattle raids has led to men being unable to buy wives and it s affecting Dinka culture WTF Bride price is an atrocious custom and needs to be stopped, culture or not Why not just get married without the damn cattle If this solution doesn t occur to Bok, then it s a problem It s also a problem that he seems quite insular and prefers to stick with fellow tribespeople I understand many people are like that but I would expect an activist to have a broader worldview and intersectional ideas Nevertheless, I found this book edifying and interesting, as well as the issues discussed in it The Arab slave trade is a pretty old institution and such customs can be very hard to dismantle What can help is educating the people on both sides and helping them move on from the past But burying tribal, religious, and racial differences is vital to that This book will break your heart This lets you look inside the mind of a child slave The whole time I read about his time in slavery I wished I could reach out and pull him into the loving comfort of a warm lap and squeeze him with tender snuggles, like all children need I will never forget this mans story. The first person account of Francis Bok, who was captured from the market town of Nyamlell at the age of seven and forced into slavery in North Sudan Some friends of mine who are also good friends of Francis lent me this book after telling me a little bit about his story It was every bit as interesting and eye opening as they indicated The culture of Sudan depicted throughout the book stands in stark contrast to the American culture in which I ve grown up It is hard to even comprehend the r The first person account of Francis Bok, who was captured from the market town of Nyamlell at the age of seven and forced into slavery in North Sudan Some friends of mine who are also good friends of Francis lent me this book after telling me a little bit about his story It was every bit as interesting and eye opening as they indicated The culture of Sudan depicted throughout the book stands in stark contrast to the American culture in which I ve grown up It is hard to even comprehend the reality of what is taking place in nations plagued by political unrest, militant religious organizations, and economic devastation Perhaps the only real way to understand is to experience it yourself, but reading books like Escape From Slavery sure goes a long way toward gaining a broader vision of the world

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